U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-08-2014, 09:17 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,531,515 times
Reputation: 17606

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
well to nitpick: 3. One could include Delaware but not Maryland.
When you're right, you're right!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-08-2014, 09:25 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,756,479 times
Reputation: 931
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Yes you could. You could also say that the states that border Canada, have a kind of Canadian feel. But, that does not make them Canadian.

Places on the border of any two or three places might have a flavor of the neighboring area. The there are areas such as Wilkes-Barre PA, in Northeastern PA. I lived there for almost three years. It felt very rust belt, very Midwestern, and very provincial. However, it is in the North Eastern Corner of a North Eastern State. So no matter what my subjective opinions are of the area, it is in the NORTH EAST.

There are arguably Rust Belt cities in New England, as well. Old NE Mill cities.

As an aside, recently while driving my son to college in Vermont, we (my DH and 18 year old DD) a noticeable difference in ambiance when we crossed the border from Vermont to up-state NY.
More light pollution at night. A difference in the architecture. Different religions. Different ethnic groups.
The geography and topography were the same. They still sold maple syrup on the side of the road. But there was a difference.

One was in New England. The other Mid Atlantic. But BOTH - North East.
Agreed. Placing Buffalo and Rochester in the Midwest because they aren't Boston or New York is ridiculous.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,141 posts, read 9,921,221 times
Reputation: 6429
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Yes you could. You could also say that the states that border Canada, have a kind of Canadian feel. But, that does not make them Canadian.

Places on the border of any two or three places might have a flavor of the neighboring area. Then there are areas such as Wilkes-Barre PA, in Northeastern PA. I lived there for almost three years. It felt very rust belt, very Midwestern, and very provincial. However, it is in the North Eastern Corner of a North Eastern State. So no matter what my subjective opinions are of the area, it is in the NORTH EAST.

There are arguably Rust Belt cities in New England, as well. Old NE Mill cities.

As an aside, recently while driving my son to college in Vermont, we (my DH and 18 year old DD)we experienced a noticeable difference in ambiance when we crossed the border from Vermont to up-state NY.
More light pollution at night. A difference in the architecture. Different religions. Different ethnic groups.
The geography and topography were the same. They still sold maple syrup on the side of the road. But there was a difference.

One was in New England. The other Mid Atlantic. But BOTH - North East.
Since the New York and Vermont border is entirely rural, I am kind of surprised you noticed more light pollution at night. Do you think that is the effect of the Capital District?

Also what do you mean by different religions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2014, 11:16 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,756,479 times
Reputation: 931
Congregationalists in New England?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 07:47 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
There are also those that carve up states and say New York State west from about Syracuse as well as Western Pennsylvania are "Midwestern" (because they're "rust belt" or whatever) and think the Northeast is just BosWash + "quaint" New England.
Maybe. But western New York feels like it has more in common with Ohio than the rest of the Northeast. I'm rather aware a lot of the interior Northeast is "rust belt" ish but it's a different feel than the Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 07:49 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Congregationalists in New England?
old church in Vermont. It's a Catholic church.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 09:18 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,284,047 times
Reputation: 48876
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Congregationalists in New England?

Yes. The Churches changed almost immediately after crossing the Vermont line back into NY. The denominations and the architecture. In Vermont churches were white clapboard and simple, with the predominant denominations being Congregationalist, Unitarian Universalist and American Baptist (the one that split with Southern Baptist over the slavery issue, and a moderate mainline denomination)
Even the Jewish temple in Bennington was wood frame and clapboard.

The predominant ethnic groups, as judged by the family names of farms, business establishments and private homes with signs were English with a smattering of French in Vermont.

In NYS it was different. Churches tended to be stone or brick, More Lutheran, Catholic.Episcopalian, and Methodist. Also more Evangelical non-denominational, as one would find in most US rural areas.

Ethnically, more German and Irish - Scotch-Irish and a few Eastern European names. Some English. No French, that I noticed.


The light pollution at night was not from the Capital District. We weren't even close at first. There were more and brighter street lights. More bill boards and signage in general. Less, quaint and just regular rural.

So there are places that actually seem to change close to a man made boarder. However, both states remain in the North East, but one is in New England.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 09:21 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,284,047 times
Reputation: 48876
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
old church in Vermont. It's a Catholic church.

Perfect example of what I mean! Even the Catholic churches in VT looked "Puritan". Even the temple we passed in Bennington Vermont was clapboard, although not white.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 03:24 PM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,497,158 times
Reputation: 3411
Delaware is beyond the Mason-Dixon line, but I guess that arc
means it is still down south to some people, while Maryland is
south and west of it.

Really, the south is wherever white people on the east coast
start talking with a southern accent, whether it is light or thick.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2014, 11:21 AM
 
620 posts, read 688,472 times
Reputation: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
Delaware is beyond the Mason-Dixon line, but I guess that arc
means it is still down south to some people, while Maryland is
south and west of it.

Really, the south is wherever white people on the east coast
start talking with a southern accent, whether it is light or thick.
Do you mean the 12 mile circle of DE/PA border?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top