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Old 01-12-2018, 05:14 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Of course not, but I don't think Huckleberries or Cranberries grow down here, and many fruit trees that thrive in cooler places (like cheery trees) don't grow very well down here.
I'll bet that there are far more plants that require warmer climates to grow than there are those that require cooler temps. Plus even those that require cooler temps have cultivars that can survive warmer climates.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:41 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,154,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
I remember being on business in Houston (I believe the notoriously 'hot' Texas city) in early May where one night dropped into the low-40s. Everyone who was hosting the conference was apologetic, that it's usually nicer that time of the year, or so they claimed. It was quite cold, windy, and damp. Wasn't a fan.
I remember that day like it was just last year. That entire winter/spring season was one long, irritating roller coaster ride, followed by several summer months of average highs in the triple digits. The early 2010s were full of weather extremes.

Quote:
Bottom line, I wouldn't call May hot in Texas. Perhaps there are some hot days, but looking at the averages it seems rather pleasant but in practice it's unpredictable.
Definitely not hot and not even all that muggy, but more so pleasantly humid and breezy with lots of storms. Easily one of my favorite months for weather in TX.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:58 PM
 
377 posts, read 201,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Now, the official weather station, housed in IAH airport well north of the city, did reach 42F in 2013...but that's the May record low for that station as well.
2013 sounds about right. And if it was 42 at IAH, it was definitely 40s inside Houston as well.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:02 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
2013 sounds about right. And if it was 42 at IAH, it was definitely 40s inside Houston as well.
Yes, though not low 40s (lowest that May was 46F). And that was the only occurrence of 40s in May at CBD between 1982-2017.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:38 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Yes, though not low 40s (lowest that May was 46F). And that was the only occurrence of 40s in May at CBD between 1982-2017.
I'm not sure what source you're using but wunderground.com has a low of 48 at Hobby in May 2014. It's also showing that, including 2017, there are several years within that time frame where a low of 50/51 was recorded at Hobby, so there's a good chance some areas a few miles north dipped into the 40s. Downtown of course will be considerably warmer than the city as a whole.
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
I'll bet that there are far more plants that require warmer climates to grow than there are those that require cooler temps. Plus even those that require cooler temps have cultivars that can survive warmer climates.
Everybody has different preferences for vegetation. I appreciate the different types of plants that grow in the US, it would be boring if they all looked the same. Actually, deep South vegetation like in North Florida or coastal South Carolina is some of my favourite to visit, but not to live around. My personal preference is for northern type trees like maples, birches, tall conifers as well as the flowers that thrive here. For the record whenever I send pictures or video chat with friends and family in the South (TX and FL) they comment on how beautiful the trees are here especially in fall. My dad is especially jealous of our soil because it's great for gardening where as S. FL soil is sandy and poor.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:00 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
I'm not sure what source you're using but wunderground.com has a low of 48 at Hobby in May 2014. It's also showing that, including 2017, there are several years within that time frame where a low of 50/51 was recorded at Hobby, so there's a good chance some areas a few miles north dipped into the 40s. Downtown of course will be considerably warmer than the city as a whole.
I used NWS, which will give data straight from the official weather station:
National Weather Service Climate

Wunderground mainly uses personal weather stations. So the temperature from "Hobby" at that didn't come from the airport weather station, but rather from someone's house near it. These stations are good, but may not have the calibration seen with official stations.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:11 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Everybody has different preferences for vegetation. I appreciate the different types of plants that grow in the US, it would be boring if they all looked the same. Actually, deep South vegetation like in North Florida or coastal South Carolina is some of my favourite to visit, but not to live around. My personal preference is for northern type trees like maples, birches, tall conifers as well as the flowers that thrive here. For the record whenever I send pictures or video chat with friends and family in the South (TX and FL) they comment on how beautiful the trees are here especially in fall. My dad is especially jealous of our soil because it's great for gardening where as S. FL soil is sandy and poor.
Not disputing that, but the North simply doesn't have the plant biodiversity than can be cultivated in the South. It's that simple.

Southwest Florida is an area of South Florida with good soil, due to rich organic matter from the Everglades and other swamps.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Not disputing that, but the North simply doesn't have the plant biodiversity than can be cultivated in the South. It's that simple.

Southwest Florida is an area of South Florida with good soil, due to rich organic matter from the Everglades and other swamps.
My mom just moved to SW Florida but my dad lives in SE.

I don't care much about plant diversity. I love my deciduous trees. There's plenty of diversity here as it is.
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Old 01-13-2018, 07:23 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,154,807 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
I used NWS, which will give data straight from the official weather station:
National Weather Service Climate

Wunderground mainly uses personal weather stations. So the temperature from "Hobby" at that didn't come from the airport weather station, but rather from someone's house near it. These stations are good, but may not have the calibration seen with official stations.
Maybe, but if a store bought thermometer tells you it's 48 degrees then it most likely feels something like 48 degrees outside, even if "official" readings say otherwise. Either way, we're talking about temps well below the average for that time of year.
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