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Old 03-01-2014, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Currently living in Reddit
5,655 posts, read 5,463,126 times
Reputation: 7254

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
i said up north portland is known as north boston
Figured you'd say that

Denny's in Bangor.

I'm kinda surprised lobster grits hasn't caught on up there.
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:01 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,549 posts, read 42,724,437 times
Reputation: 57209
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Lutefisk. It's lye-soaked fish with a jelly-like consistency. I'm familiar with it, having gone to a Scandinavian school, but know nobody who actually eats it. But it is a traditional Christmas feast thing.
LOL, we were Swedish, but were spared the joy of lutefisk.

In Ohio, I was first introduced to the holiday classic, Hash brown cheese casserole. We can't have ham without it.
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:05 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,549 posts, read 42,724,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teddy52 View Post
Only regional food I can't hack is grits.

Reminds me of wallpaper paste.
Wow, I've really learned to love grits with butter, salt and pepper. I only really get it when I eat breakfast out, since its always on the side. I prefer it to the ubiquitous soggy hash brown potatoes.
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
Reputation: 10153
There are some weird regional foods here in Finland. In one area there is something called Kalakukko which is basically fish baked inside a rye bread loaf. The same area also has blood dumpling soup which I do not ever want to try! And the city I used to live in has its black sauage (blood sausage) served with lingonberry jam. Less disgusting is the squeaky cheese/bread cheese from up north, served with cloudberry jam, or in a cup with coffee on which sounds very weird to me.
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:45 AM
 
11,697 posts, read 16,450,382 times
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Girls Raised In The South = grits:>)

Italians call it polenta. Southerners call it grits. A basic starch you can modify from baby food consistency to fried/baked.

My mother's face when she was asked if she would care for Georgia ice cream at a cat fish fry - priceless!
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Old 03-01-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,724,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natsku View Post
There are some weird regional foods here in Finland. In one area there is something called Kalakukko which is basically fish baked inside a rye bread loaf. The same area also has blood dumpling soup which I do not ever want to try! And the city I used to live in has its black sauage (blood sausage) served with lingonberry jam. Less disgusting is the squeaky cheese/bread cheese from up north, served with cloudberry jam, or in a cup with coffee on which sounds very weird to me.
I remember black/blood sausage being served frequently for breakfast when I was in boarding school in the UK. Also some sort of white pudding-y sausage with raisins in it? I cannot recall the correct name for that.

I liked both, though. Of course I was a kid and at that time would eat anything that didn't try to eat me first.

Serving coffee with butter is becoming A Thing in some areas.

Latest coffee trend is to put butter in your coffee | Fox News
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Old 03-01-2014, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,361,269 times
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Coffee with butter (or coconut oil) is a big trend with the paleo crowd (as well as the raving-about-the-"toxins"-in-everything crowd that the Bulletproof Coffee guy is part of) for the moment. I'll stick with full fat cream.
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Old 03-01-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,463 posts, read 4,579,619 times
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When I lived on the Gulf Coast in Mississippi, a popular food was a store-bought honeybun, heated slightly and topped with a slice of American cheese. Never saw the appeal, but the locals seemed to love them.
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Old 03-01-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,319 posts, read 5,223,751 times
Reputation: 10153
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I remember black/blood sausage being served frequently for breakfast when I was in boarding school in the UK. Also some sort of white pudding-y sausage with raisins in it? I cannot recall the correct name for that.

I liked both, though. Of course I was a kid and at that time would eat anything that didn't try to eat me first.

Serving coffee with butter is becoming A Thing in some areas.

Latest coffee trend is to put butter in your coffee | Fox News
Black pudding, occasionally you get it in a breakfast fry-up. I tried it once I think, in Scotland. Not sure what the white one with raisins is though.
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Old 03-01-2014, 09:11 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,534,340 times
Reputation: 28710
99% of people who say "Haggis is gross!!!" can't even tell you what haggis is. I'm brave, though, I like chip shop haggis and no one actually knows what that is.

Black pudding is good, but I like it slathered in the bean sauce and some runny egg yolk.

As far as grits, if you can eat polenta, corn bread, tamales or anything made from cornmeal at all, grits are nothing to worry about. I don't understand why people are grossed out by the concept of grits unless they ave an aversion to corn.

As far as lutefisk, that is one of those starvation era foods that (some) people serve once a year so that when the next famine comes, the current generation will know about it so they can survive as their ancestors did.

It is not lye-soaked fish per se, It is very hard dried-preserved cod fillet that is able to be stored for long periods of time (hence its utility in times of food scarcity). Then it is briefly soaked in lye to soften it after which the lye is soaked away in water. Then the fish can be cooked. Although it takes on an... unusual texture, it tastes quite good.
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