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Old 02-26-2010, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,630,375 times
Reputation: 3235

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Of course, they didn't have that many to begin with. I think the economy in that state has something to do with that and they also have 2 Air Force Base in locations in Minot and Grand Forks, which brings in some "diversity" to those areas and have noticeable amounts of Black folks. Percentage of Black people on these bases are: 12% and 9.7%. Fargo's economy has grown and the Black population has grown to just over 2% there.
There are actually three Air Force Bases: Minot, Grand Forks, and Cavalier.

Also, the county I'm moving to has a grand total of seven black people (eight, including me), at least according to the 2000 census, there may be many more now. It doesn't bother me. I've always lived in predominantly white neighborhoods and associate with white/mainstream culture, so I'll fit right in.

 
Old 02-26-2010, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,282,550 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
So why when I do the exact same thing, I'm called a "self-hating racist" as you mentioned how I was a few pages back. If any of you took my posting as "racist," I apologize. My scorning isn't applicable to ALL African Americans. And being from Maryland, I would think you would understand some of the actions of people from certain (not all, but certain) black neighborhoods.

The reason I may come off as more insensitive is because of the experiences I've faced. I'm assuming that most of you who speak well of the overall black community are from predominantly black neighborhoods that embraced you as one of their own, or were raised back in earlier decades when black camaraderie was much more common. Well, I didn't receive the total love and embrace that the black community bragged about, so yea, I admit to being very bitter of it. And being reminded constantly of not being unwanted by the local community that apparently is supposed to be connected by a "shared history" really gets nauseating after years of the same old hypocritical garbage! It's something I can't talk about with 90 percent of my family members, and I really don't want to wear out the 10 percent who understands what I'm facing.


Well I definitely need to at least check out Houston. This is assuming that the black communities aren't all that monolithic. And now that I think about it, wasn't it during the 70s/60s and earlier when blacks were trying to make make do for themselves, integrate into the American mainstream, and make progress through academic and peaceful means that the most resistance and riots were started by the whites who were racist? It seems that today, every other non-black person loves to complain about the violent and ghetto behaviors of a few blacks, but no one wants to protest it. Also, I recall from my experiences while attended college in Maryland, there was a much more embrace of blacks who would act like buffoons and wannabe thugs. The reason I may constantly bash the Northeast for this (Urbanized BosWash Northeast, NOT Rural Upstate Northeast) is because most of the non-blacks would always try to and patronize normal and educated blacks, try to nullify their achievements, and act like they're no better than those who act bitter, ghetto, and uneducated. I consider this worse in terms of racist acts than straight out yelling racial slurs. But in my experience, this is hardly an issue with non-blacks from nearly all of the other regions.

Doesn't it make one wonder?
I apologize for coming off harshly. I'm not from a predominantly black neighborhood. I'm also from Maryland too.

What I would like to say to you is this: How about who cares? Anywhere you go there will be racist people and racist black people. If you want these kind of people to go away, be the change you want to see. It's like their words have really gotten to you, you fell for their bait. They've got you analyzing every region and classify them based upon how the black people are in each one and how the white people are. I can't help but notice every single post by you I've stumbled across on the entire forum is about where "educated" black people are most accepted and where not to go. Maybe by chance I've come across all the wrong posts and there is more you post about. It seems like an obsession, a deep insecurity about being black that really doesn't need to be there. Who cares if some guy thinks you're an "oreo"? I'm willing to bet the kind of person who says that to you has A LOT less going for him than you do! Do you think some of the most educated, well spoken white people were lauded by all whites? Of course not, some of the most successful white friends I have today were called "geeks" "nerds" and losers all through life - and now the name callers are employed the by the very same person. Who's laughing now? The same kind of people would have told Obama he's acting white and rejected him, only to consider him the first "black" president some years later!

Furthermore, it's simply not fair to paint an entire group of people as being like that. I simply don't believe that these people are anymore "black" than you or I, and I know plenty of black people who would be delighted to know you aren't out trying to prove how "hard" you are. It really seems like like these types of people have actually succeeded in convincing you that they are "real" black people and you are not. MLK was a real black guy right? People said the same stuff to him and his family for changing their name to "Luther" after a German! People said the same stuff to W.E.B. Du Bois, and countless other people who are now considered inspirational black Americans. Think about it.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,093 posts, read 4,161,756 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I apologize for coming off harshly. I'm not from a predominantly black neighborhood. I'm also from Maryland too.

What I would like to say to you is this: How about who cares? Anywhere you go there will be racist people and racist black people. If you want these kind of people to go away, be the change you want to see. It's like their words have really gotten to you, you fell for their bait. They've got you analyzing every region and classify them based upon how the black people are in each one and how the white people are. I can't help but notice every single post by you I've stumbled across on the entire forum is about where "educated" black people are most accepted and where not to go. Maybe by chance I've come across all the wrong posts and there is more you post about. It seems like an obsession, a deep insecurity about being black that really doesn't need to be there. Who cares if some guy thinks you're an "oreo"? I'm willing to bet the kind of person who says that to you has A LOT less going for him than you do! Do you think some of the most educated, well spoken white people were lauded by all whites? Of course not, some of the most successful white friends I have today were called "geeks" "nerds" and losers all through life - and now the name callers are employed the by the very same person. Who's laughing now? The same kind of people would have told Obama he's acting white and rejected him, only to consider him the first "black" president some years later!

Furthermore, it's simply not fair to paint an entire group of people as being like that. I simply don't believe that these people are anymore "black" than you or I, and I know plenty of black people who would be delighted to know you aren't out trying to prove how "hard" you are. It really seems like like these types of people have actually succeeded in convincing you that they are "real" black people and you are not. MLK was a real black guy right? People said the same stuff to him and his family for changing their name to "Luther" after a German! People said the same stuff to W.E.B. Du Bois, and countless other people who are now considered inspirational black Americans. Think about it.
Bingo, this is pretty much it.

@ Fairfaxian

In my personal experiences i've been called an oreo before in my life. But i've also been embraced by many in the black community (including those a person might refer to as "ghetto"). I guarantee you it would shock the hell out of a lot of people who know me at UT if they saw the type of people I usually hang out with.

If you're just you and are a real person then more often than not you will be accepted by other good people whether they be "ghetto" or not. Me for example, I grew up in black neighborhoods in East Austin when I was younger and I was always the "different" one. But I was still cool with most of the people who lived there. The funny part about it is the first time I was ever called an oreo was when I moved to a much more racially diverse area in Pflugerville (a suburb of Austin). I feel like i'm rambling and not making a real point so i'll end it here. But my point is no matter where you are if you're a good person you will be accepted by other good people. Don't let what someone says get to you so much...just be yourself and you'll be fine.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,525 posts, read 7,360,394 times
Reputation: 2044
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
It sounds about right to me. Ask about any black professional and they all are familiar with being told they are "trying to be white". Ask a black guy who likes rock music or classical music or who prefers doing math instead of playing basketball.
I understand what you mean by black people who actually listen to rock music are looked at funny. I lived in a majority black suburb all my life and its rare to find a black person blasting some Linkin Park, Fall out Boys etc.

I can't agree with you that blacks who get good grades in school are picked on. Ironically, I knew some blacks who were athletes or ghetto acting, yet they had As and Bs in high school. Nobody picked on them. Its only when you're super nerdy, had a different taste in music/style, or socially awkward is when you are an easy target for getting called a lame, laughed at or bullied.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 03:23 PM
 
57,394 posts, read 81,835,783 times
Reputation: 12705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
I understand what you mean by black people who actually listen to rock music are looked at funny. I lived in a majority black suburb all my life and its rare to find a black person blasting some Linkin Park, Fall out Boys etc.

I can't agree with you that blacks who get good grades in school are picked on. Ironically, I knew some blacks who were athletes or ghetto acting, yet they had As and Bs in high school. Nobody picked on them. Its only when you're super nerdy, had a different taste in music/style, or socially awkward is when you are an easy target for getting called a lame, laughed at or bullied.
Great points and guess what? At my school the kids that fit that description would get picked on as well and the parties involved would be White. So, it really is a matter of being ultra nerdy/geeky or having "peculiar" tastes.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,837,771 times
Reputation: 7282
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
So why when I do the exact same thing, I'm called a "self-hating racist" as you mentioned how I was a few pages back. If any of you took my posting as "racist," I apologize. My scorning isn't applicable to ALL African Americans. And being from Maryland, I would think you would understand some of the actions of people from certain (not all, but certain) black neighborhoods.

The reason I may come off as more insensitive is because of the experiences I've faced. I'm assuming that most of you who speak well of the overall black community are from predominantly black neighborhoods that embraced you as one of their own, or were raised back in earlier decades when black camaraderie was much more common. Well, I didn't receive the total love and embrace that the black community bragged about, so yea, I admit to being very bitter of it. And being reminded constantly of not being unwanted by the local community that apparently is supposed to be connected by a "shared history" really gets nauseating after years of the same old hypocritical garbage! It's something I can't talk about with 90 percent of my family members, and I really don't want to wear out the 10 percent who understands what I'm facing.


Well I definitely need to at least check out Houston. This is assuming that the black communities aren't all that monolithic. And now that I think about it, wasn't it during the 70s/60s and earlier when blacks were trying to make make do for themselves, integrate into the American mainstream, and make progress through academic and peaceful means that the most resistance and riots were started by the whites who were racist? It seems that today, every other non-black person loves to complain about the violent and ghetto behaviors of a few blacks, but no one wants to protest it. Also, I recall from my experiences while attended college in Maryland, there was a much more embrace of blacks who would act like buffoons and wannabe thugs. The reason I may constantly bash the Northeast for this (Urbanized BosWash Northeast, NOT Rural Upstate Northeast) is because most of the non-blacks would always try to and patronize normal and educated blacks, try to nullify their achievements, and act like they're no better than those who act bitter, ghetto, and uneducated. I consider this worse in terms of racist acts than straight out yelling racial slurs. But in my experience, this is hardly an issue with non-blacks from nearly all of the other regions.

I wouldn't want to tell you Houston is much better when it comes to the situation like the ones you discussed and you get here and see its the same. However, it's more intergrated the DC. Another thing is I stay in 3rd Ward (predominately black) and I heard all types of blacks bumping out there car speakers Miley Cyrus: Party in America lol....I kid you not. Some were even playing Jonas Brothers: Burnin up.

Doesn't it make one wonder?
^^^^^^
 
Old 02-26-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,837,771 times
Reputation: 7282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
I understand what you mean by black people who actually listen to rock music are looked at funny. I lived in a majority black suburb all my life and its rare to find a black person blasting some Linkin Park, Fall out Boys etc.

I can't agree with you that blacks who get good grades in school are picked on. Ironically, I knew some blacks who were athletes or ghetto acting, yet they had As and Bs in high school. Nobody picked on them. Its only when you're super nerdy, had a different taste in music/style, or socially awkward is when you are an easy target for getting called a lame, laughed at or bullied.
Yeah; I think lots of things being said on here are exaggerated. I doubt people are celebrating and praising blacks for failing or dropping out of school. In the black community that I was raised in; educated blacks were congratulated and honored.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,525 posts, read 7,360,394 times
Reputation: 2044
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Yeah; I think lots of things being said on here are exaggerated. I doubt people are celebrating and praising blacks for failing or dropping out of school. In the black community that I was raised in; educated blacks were congratulated and honored.

You're right about that. I know drop outs and ex gang members telling me to get an education and don't end up going down the wrong path like they did, only to regret it later. However, I do agree that education is still not embrace enough in the African American community. What I see in many majority African-American areas is lack of flexibility, especially when it comes to taste in music and even fashion. Even in majority middle class and upper middle class black neighborhoods I'm familiar with, the dress code, slang, and music taste is identical to what you hear if you were in the hood. The same rap and rnb crowd. Don't get me wrong, I listen to a lot of Rap and RnB, but I like to switch it up a bit and listen to other genres too. And also, I personally wish there were more secular/atheist blacks in the black community. I think there are too many churches in predominately black neighborhoods. Beside myself, I don't know another black person who is secular or atheist and outside the internet.

Last edited by Chicagoland60426; 02-26-2010 at 05:16 PM..
 
Old 02-26-2010, 05:04 PM
 
57,394 posts, read 81,835,783 times
Reputation: 12705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
You're right about that. I know drop outs and ex gang members telling me to get an education and don't end up going down the wrong path like they did, only to regret it later. The problem with too many majority African-American areas is glorifying the inner city mentality and lack of flexibility when it comes to taste in music and even fashion. Even in majority middle class and upper middle class black neighborhoods I'm familiar with, the dress code and music taste is identical to what you hear if you were in the hood. The same rap and rnb crowd. Don't get me wrong, I listen to a lot of Rap and RnB, but I like to switch it up a bit and listen to other genres too.
I'm surprised that you didn't mention House. In my area, you do get other Black folks that like Gospel, Blues, Reggae and Jazz. Some might even like some Rock or Country too. In Louisiana, you might get some the like Zydeco.
 
Old 02-26-2010, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,469 posts, read 8,480,572 times
Reputation: 5522
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yeah, I've noticed that too. Geography has a lot to do with that. For instance, with NY, most of the Hispanics/Latinos here come from the Caribbean and it isn't as easy for them to immigrate here, as it would for say Mexicans to come to Texas, California and other Southwestern states. Same with the proximity of Asian immigrants to those states in comparison to NY. While NY still has their share, it's not like CA and Texas.

What also makes it more interesting for NY is that many of the Hispanics/Latinos are of African descent. So, there is a somewhat shared culture between African-Americans/Blacks with roots in the Caribbean and the Hispanic/Latino communities here. In TX and CA, the Hispanics/Latinos are more Mestizo(Native/Spanish and some African mix). So, the cultures are generally more different.

NY's Black population is also growing, but mainly due to immigration from the Caribbean and Africa.
Also please let us keep in mind that Puerto Ricans are not immigrant. Even those that are born in Puerto Rico, because PR is part of the US.
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