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Old 01-06-2019, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Virginia
3,957 posts, read 2,030,149 times
Reputation: 10864

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackiemohro View Post
Same here. Our car got diagnosed with lymphoma on thanksgiving. We have the arrangements made with a mobile vet. She is ready whenever our cat is. We are also still hoping for the “magic dust” that comes and makes him go without vet.

Gambo is a difficult cat (rescue) and only trusts us. He hates guests and immediately hides. So I hope he won’t freak out when she is coming in. Anything I can give him maybe an hour before the vet arrives to calm him?

Also, I assume it’s best to remain calm and not cry till he is gone? How did you handle? I cry just thinking of it so not sure how to remain calm and normal.
Sometimes it's just not possible to NOT cry until after the procedure is over. When I had to have one of first cats, CoCo, euthanized, I was crying so hard before they even started that I was almost hyperventilating. That cat slept on my head for 10 years and would climb up on my shoulders and be held like a big baby, so it was really hard to let her go. In fact, it's been 10 years and I'm tearing up as I type this. When the vet gave her the first calming shot, as they should Gambo, she was totally relaxed at that point. However, if you think Gambo needs calming before going to the vet, you might get an Rx for Prozac, which will mellow him out.

BTW, for those who worry about the "first" shot, there is the alternative of administering gas to calm the cat down. My Russian Blue was terrified of needles and would scream the office down, so he was anesthetized with gas and then got the final shot when it was his time. And I bawled like a baby as I held him as well.
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Old 02-01-2019, 04:12 PM
 
5 posts, read 1,695 times
Reputation: 15
As hard as it is to see your pet "go to sleep" it is so much more difficult and selfish to watch them suffer.
My sweet 17 year old Mickey (dachshund) had to be given back to God last Monday via an emergency vet visit. I'm thankful we went after hours, as it was much calmer than a regular work day. THe lights were dim, it was quiet, and we were able to help him feel more relaxed.
He had only been diagnosed with congestive heart failure 3 weeks earlier. He didn't respond well to the meds, over all, so this was our only option.
I struggle with whether or not he was suffering greatly, as he had stopped eating his usual food, but would eat the boiled chicken breast if I would hand feed it to him, and he still drank water, walked , went potty on his own, but in the end, the last day, his breathing was far more labored. I had to wait for my son to be able to come be with me. We had gotten Mickey when my son was only 16, and now he is 32! Mickey was estimated to be 2 years old when we rescued him.
It was very hard for us to endure, but we know it was tougher for Mick, and we searched our hearts, and made an educated decision based on what the vet had to tell us.
It is so important to be there for them. Can you imagine your last moments on the earth in a strange room, on a cold table with nobody around you who is familiar?
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
5,842 posts, read 8,602,375 times
Reputation: 6286
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Hell no is right! NO WAY would I not be present....!

I wonder about the 90%....that seems an awfully high percentage...
It seems hard to believe. There's no way I would abandon my dog in her last moments, no matter how difficult it was to be there.
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
5,842 posts, read 8,602,375 times
Reputation: 6286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dances_With_Dachshunds View Post
As hard as it is to see your pet "go to sleep" it is so much more difficult and selfish to watch them suffer.
My sweet 17 year old Mickey (dachshund) had to be given back to God last Monday via an emergency vet visit. I'm thankful we went after hours, as it was much calmer than a regular work day. THe lights were dim, it was quiet, and we were able to help him feel more relaxed.
He had only been diagnosed with congestive heart failure 3 weeks earlier. He didn't respond well to the meds, over all, so this was our only option.
I struggle with whether or not he was suffering greatly, as he had stopped eating his usual food, but would eat the boiled chicken breast if I would hand feed it to him, and he still drank water, walked , went potty on his own, but in the end, the last day, his breathing was far more labored. I had to wait for my son to be able to come be with me. We had gotten Mickey when my son was only 16, and now he is 32! Mickey was estimated to be 2 years old when we rescued him.
It was very hard for us to endure, but we know it was tougher for Mick, and we searched our hearts, and made an educated decision based on what the vet had to tell us.
It is so important to be there for them. Can you imagine your last moments on the earth in a strange room, on a cold table with nobody around you who is familiar?
My condolences to you on the loss of your dog. They are very much part of the family, and their love is so pure. My dog brings nothing but joy into my life and I dread the day that I will lose her.

Sometimes letting go is the kindest thing you can do. That was driven home to me a long time ago, a short time after my previous dog passed away. I was walking in the park on a warm summer day and I saw an older couple out with their dog. The dog's legs were attached to some device with wheels, because its hind end had apparently given out. The dog was pulling itself all on its front legs and was obviously suffering. The couple was oblivious to their dog's suffering, enjoying their nice stroll. I realized right then that we had done the right thing in releasing our dog from her suffering. It is selfish to keep a suffering pet alive because you don't want to let go.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,690 posts, read 8,476,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzleman View Post
My condolences to you on the loss of your dog. They are very much part of the family, and their love is so pure. My dog brings nothing but joy into my life and I dread the day that I will lose her.

Sometimes letting go is the kindest thing you can do. That was driven home to me a long time ago, a short time after my previous dog passed away. I was walking in the park on a warm summer day and I saw an older couple out with their dog. The dog's legs were attached to some device with wheels, because its hind end had apparently given out. The dog was pulling itself all on its front legs and was obviously suffering. The couple was oblivious to their dog's suffering, enjoying their nice stroll. I realized right then that we had done the right thing in releasing our dog from her suffering. It is selfish to keep a suffering pet alive because you don't want to let go.
You win the award for the most judgmental and condescending comment of the day. You don't know the couple or the dog and you can't possibly know what the owners or dog are going through or thinking. Most dog owners second guess themselves a million times about when the right time is to euthanize. They don't want to do it too soon, because they don't want to miss out on any quality time the dog might still have. They don't want to do it too late because they cannot know exactly how the dog is feeling. And they live with the dog every day. You don't.

I am going thorough the exact same condition with my old Great Dane. She is losing strength in her back legs from a mysterious illness, but the vet suspects it is degenerating myelopathy, the canine equivalent of Lou Gehrig's disease, a genetic, progressive, painless but fatal neurological disease in which the dog slowly loses all muscular control, starting with the hind limbs. Treatment is supportive, focusing on improving quality of life, and one of the main supportive aids is the wheeled cart, which really helps the dog with weak muscles, just like the dog you saw was using. I am looking into that now for her. I am agonizing over when I need to make that awful decision, since she is not hurting at all. If that dog has that condition (and it's likely he/she does because it's relatively common,) the dog may still be enjoying life.
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
5,842 posts, read 8,602,375 times
Reputation: 6286
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
You win the award for the most judgmental and condescending comment of the day. You don't know the couple or the dog and you can't possibly know what the owners or dog are going through or thinking. Most dog owners second guess themselves a million times about when the right time is to euthanize. They don't want to do it too soon, because they don't want to miss out on any quality time the dog might still have. They don't want to do it too late because they cannot know exactly how the dog is feeling. And they live with the dog every day. You don't.

I am going thorough the exact same condition with my old Great Dane. She is losing strength in her back legs from a mysterious illness, but the vet suspects it is degenerating myelopathy, the canine equivalent of Lou Gehrig's disease, a genetic, progressive, painless but fatal neurological disease in which the dog slowly loses all muscular control, starting with the hind limbs. Treatment is supportive, focusing on improving quality of life, and one of the main supportive aids is the wheeled cart, which really helps the dog with weak muscles, just like the dog you saw was using. I am looking into that now for her. I am agonizing over when I need to make that awful decision, since she is not hurting at all. If that dog has that condition (and it's likely he/she does because it's relatively common,) the dog may still be enjoying life.
It was a hot and humid day and they took the dog out for a long walk. I could see that the dog was suffering. A long walk like that is not necessary for a suffering dog. I stand by my opinion. I have been in that position and know what it is like. I wish you the best with you dog. It's a very difficult and painful thing.

Last edited by dazzleman; 02-02-2019 at 01:10 PM..
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Old 02-04-2019, 08:07 PM
 
11,929 posts, read 21,513,618 times
Reputation: 11708
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzleman View Post
It was a hot and humid day and they took the dog out for a long walk. I could see that the dog was suffering. A long walk like that is not necessary for a suffering dog. I stand by my opinion. I have been in that position and know what it is like. I wish you the best with you dog. It's a very difficult and painful thing.
Actually the disease is not painful. Imagine losing the feeling in your legs - you lose track of where they are and gradually lose muscle mass as well. You don't suffer because there are no more nerves, but cognitive wise the dog is 100% there. Our dog lived with DM from fall 2015 through Jan 2019 when a tumor most likely was her demise. During that time she could walk on her own most times, her feet just needed protecting from scraping. During her last couple days when we gave her a chance to pull through she was weak but mostly due to lack of food intake. It was sad to see how quick they go. During her last walk the night before I had to use a sling to hold up her hind legs - DM seems to go very slowly until it quickly over a few days strikes and finsishes off their rear end.

A cart would restore mobility similar to how a wheelchair helps humans who are paralyzed. It's quite admirable the couple were taking care of their dog this way - most would give up much earlier on and condemn the dog. Since they are cognitively there, and if still happy and not in pain, you aren't really "putting them out of their misery" if you put the effort into taking care of them. Similar to a special needs child.
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Old 02-26-2019, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,628 posts, read 11,166,763 times
Reputation: 37671
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
An article on Dailymail.com quoted a "tired, broken-hearted vet" in South Africa as saying most people don't understand that if they do not stay with their pet during euthanasia, the pet ends up frightened and looking around desperately for their owner as they are euthanized.

Broke my heart. Vets say it is the responsibility of the owner to be there. I agree...it's hard but our last responsibility to our beloved pet.


I have not been able to stand watching any of my beloved pets take their last breath. I know it is weak of me, but I simply could not stand to be there.

The only time I did was when my son had to have his wonderful cat Chewy put down, and I forced myself to be in the room when that happened, simply to be there for my son. Seeing that still haunts me.
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Old 02-26-2019, 12:29 PM
 
199 posts, read 69,245 times
Reputation: 416
Oh, God. It's one of the hardest things we have to do as humans. I made my mom go with me, and I was 40. But there's no way I would've let my girl go in there without me. I ugly-cried the whole time. Shoot, I'm crying right now just typing it, and it's been 5 years.
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Old 02-27-2019, 11:11 PM
 
13,408 posts, read 6,688,989 times
Reputation: 12875
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I have not been able to stand watching any of my beloved pets take their last breath. I know it is weak of me, but I simply could not stand to be there.

The only time I did was when my son had to have his wonderful cat Chewy put down, and I forced myself to be in the room when that happened, simply to be there for my son. Seeing that still haunts me.
It's ok if you can't, it really is. I can't not be there, and that is ok too.
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