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Old 07-28-2011, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Home!
8,710 posts, read 10,401,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosco55David View Post
Look, jurors change their mind on during deliberations. That's how deliberation works. There is nothing wrong with doing so. As for the "strong personality" well he must have had the compelling argument if the others changed their minds.
I highly doubt that the only reason people change their minds about their own original thoughts is because one has the "compelling argument". There is no way to know people's backgrounds and how it affected their personality today. You could have some very wimpy, scared, don't really care, easily swayed by the stronger voice, people in a group.

I could live never having to sit on a jury and be completely fine with that. I don't agree with their verdict, but that is from the comfort of my own sofa.

 
Old 07-28-2011, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Out West
22,707 posts, read 16,813,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimba01 View Post
I highly doubt that the only reason people change their minds about their own original thoughts is because one has the "compelling argument". There is no way to know people's backgrounds and how it affected their personality today. You could have some very wimpy, scared, don't really care, easily swayed by the stronger voice, people in a group.

I could live never having to sit on a jury and be completely fine with that. I don't agree with their verdict, but that is from the comfort of my own sofa.
Someone asked if anyone had ever been the "one" in a jury of 12. I answered that I had.

Yes, I was that one. And apparently my compelling argument was good enough to change the minds of all but a few. It ended up in a hung jury but yes, it IS possible for ONE person to have a compelling argument that will indeed cause others to rethink and take another look at pieces of evidence they either forgot about or were unsure about.
 
Old 07-28-2011, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Home!
8,710 posts, read 10,401,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
Someone asked if anyone had ever been the "one" in a jury of 12. I answered that I had.

Yes, I was that one. And apparently my compelling argument was good enough to change the minds of all but a few. It ended up in a hung jury but yes, it IS possible for ONE person to have a compelling argument that will indeed cause others to rethink and take another look at pieces of evidence they either forgot about or were unsure about.
That's great! I didn't say one could not ever do that, just that a compelling argument is not the only reason a group sways.
 
Old 07-28-2011, 05:36 PM
 
745 posts, read 1,295,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosco55David View Post
Interesting, well written piece. There are a couple problems with it though. He calls out the jury for saying the cause and time of death were not shown, but the fact is they were not. They were able to come up with a general estimation for the time of death based on body decomposition, but it was not narrow enough to be real useful. Cause of death was impossible to determine as well due to the decomposition. He also goes on talking about the chloroform despite no traces of the chemical being found on the remains. These were all central pieces to the case that even the prosecution admitted were somewhat weak.
1- cause and exact time of death are not absolutely necessary to obtain a conviction.
2-would you really expect to find traces of a chemical on remains that were submerged in water for weeks?
3- traces of chloroform were found in casey's trunk. one could logically deduce that if chloroform was in her trunk (where the dead body was) that chloroform was also present on the body.
 
Old 07-28-2011, 06:03 PM
 
9,526 posts, read 4,866,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StephM View Post
1- cause and exact time of death are not absolutely necessary to obtain a conviction.
2-would you really expect to find traces of a chemical on remains that were submerged in water for weeks?
3- traces of chloroform were found in casey's trunk. one could logically deduce that if chloroform was in her trunk (where the dead body was) that chloroform was also present on the body.
Concluding Caylee's body was in the trunk because chloroform and the smell of a body were in the trunk involves connecting a dot. Casey's lies about Caylee's location mean more dots to connect. Toss in all the other circumstantial evidence and, my goodness, how can a jury connect All those dots.
 
Old 07-28-2011, 07:51 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 9,301,860 times
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According to Pinellas Sheriff Office no threats to jurors.

How many threats are being investigated by the Pinellas Sheriff's Office and when?

According to Pinellas, there have been no threats to investigate.

Sgt. Tom Nestor from the Pinellas Sheriff's Office told us, "There hasn't been any threats. We're not making a comment about what the judge did. It doesn't concern us. We're staying out of it. Whatever the judge wants to do, that's up to him. He's in Orlando."

The question remains - why did Judge Perry claim Pinellas deputies were investigating threats, if they were not?


Did Judge Perry lie in Casey Anthony trial?
 
Old 07-28-2011, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Ohio
15,159 posts, read 13,420,911 times
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I think Judge Perry did the right thing.

Even it there have been no threats, the jurors should be able to go about their daily lives without being accosted by the media or "peaceful" protestors.
 
Old 07-29-2011, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Tampa (by way of Omaha)
13,929 posts, read 19,146,190 times
Reputation: 9155
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephM View Post
3- traces of chloroform were found in casey's trunk. one could logically deduce that if chloroform was in her trunk (where the dead body was) that chloroform was also present on the body.
A couple problems here.

1) You can find traces of chloroform in lots of places. It is not an uncommon compound and can be find where chlorinated (read: pool) water is present. I believe this even came up in the trial as one of the expert witnesses showed that there were trace elements of chloroform on a barbie doll he borrowed from a co-worker.

2) No one could conclusively state that human remains were in the trunk. They only had the smell, which is highly debatable and open to interpretation as evidenced by the people who said it was indistinguishable from garbage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaWoman View Post
According to Pinellas Sheriff Office no threats to jurors.

How many threats are being investigated by the Pinellas Sheriff's Office and when?

According to Pinellas, there have been no threats to investigate.

Sgt. Tom Nestor from the Pinellas Sheriff's Office told us, "There hasn't been any threats. We're not making a comment about what the judge did. It doesn't concern us. We're staying out of it. Whatever the judge wants to do, that's up to him. He's in Orlando."

The question remains - why did Judge Perry claim Pinellas deputies were investigating threats, if they were not?

Did Judge Perry lie in Casey Anthony trial?
Just an FYI, PCSO is just one of about 19 law enforcement agencies in Pinellas County. Even if they are not investigating threats, any one of those other agencies could be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post
I think Judge Perry did the right thing.

Even it there have been no threats, the jurors should be able to go about their daily lives without being accosted by the media or "peaceful" protestors.
Personally, I'd like to juror names exempted from the public record law as there is really no good reason to give that information out. I think Judge Perry probably would have liked to have had that option in this case.
 
Old 07-29-2011, 05:33 AM
 
3,173 posts, read 3,075,159 times
Reputation: 3699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosco55David View Post
A couple problems here.

1) You can find traces of chloroform in lots of places. It is not an uncommon compound and can be find where chlorinated (read: pool) water is present. I believe this even came up in the trial as one of the expert witnesses showed that there were trace elements of chloroform on a barbie doll he borrowed from a co-worker.

2) No one could conclusively state that human remains were in the trunk. They only had the smell, which is highly debatable and open to interpretation as evidenced by the people who said it was indistinguishable from garbage.



Just an FYI, PCSO is just one of about 19 law enforcement agencies in Pinellas County. Even if they are not investigating threats, any one of those other agencies could be.



Personally, I'd like to juror names exempted from the public record law as there is really no good reason to give that information out. I think Judge Perry probably would have liked to have had that option in this case.
Cadaver dogs know the difference between garbage and decomp.
So do most homicide detectives.
I know the difference and have only smelled one dead body (3 days dead).
Made trips to a dumpster shared by 6 families for years, never smelled anything close to that dead body. He lived in a basement apartment and I lived above on the 2nd floor. The smell was actually horrible and the reason he was found.

As far as the chloroform, the Anthony's did not have chlorine in their pool.
They used something else, can't remember but not chlorine.
 
Old 07-29-2011, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 30,732,152 times
Reputation: 14583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosco55David View Post
A couple problems here.

1) You can find traces of chloroform in lots of places. It is not an uncommon compound and can be find where chlorinated (read: pool) water is present. I believe this even came up in the trial as one of the expert witnesses showed that there were trace elements of chloroform on a barbie doll he borrowed from a co-worker.

2) No one could conclusively state that human remains were in the trunk. They only had the smell, which is highly debatable and open to interpretation as evidenced by the people who said it was indistinguishable from garbage.



Just an FYI, PCSO is just one of about 19 law enforcement agencies in Pinellas County. Even if they are not investigating threats, any one of those other agencies could be.



Personally, I'd like to juror names exempted from the public record law as there is really no good reason to give that information out. I think Judge Perry probably would have liked to have had that option in this case.
I agree. While I disagree with their decision, they were doing their civic duty and jurors should not have public reactions to worry about when they deliberate. There will always be someone who disagrees with your verdict and they don't need your name and home address (easy enough to find if you have a name).
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