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Old 11-01-2016, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Ontario Canada
48 posts, read 30,166 times
Reputation: 38

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessxwrites89 View Post
American looking to move to Toronto. Was trying to apply for permanent residency and thought I needed 67 points. Took the IELTS, scored a band of 8.5, and had my college education assessed. Saturday I went to apply and took the CIC suggestion of applying for federal skilled workers. I now have 438 points. What does this mean? Can I apply for PR? It said the minimum points required were met. Do I need to apply for work first? HELP!
No. You have to wait for your application to be processed which takes time. There are millions of people from all over the world who want to come to Canada and you will be competing against them (and their skill level) to even qualify for a spot. Getting a (high paying) job in Canada is more difficult for an immigrant unless you have a highly specialized skill that we need.
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Old 11-01-2016, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Candy Kingdom
3,221 posts, read 2,692,801 times
Reputation: 5162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookiebutter View Post
No. You have to wait for your application to be processed which takes time. There are millions of people from all over the world who want to come to Canada and you will be competing against them (and their skill level) to even qualify for a spot. Getting a (high paying) job in Canada is more difficult for an immigrant unless you have a highly specialized skill that we need.
Makes sense. Hmmm... I wonder if I should try other countries too. I just don't want to go to China. I have an English degree and I have heard that is in demand in China. For health and spiritual reasons, I won't go to China.

Thank you for your help!
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Old 11-15-2016, 08:04 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,371 times
Reputation: 10
I have a question about Citizenship by descent
I understand the Citizenship Act was amended in 2009 to limit—with a few exceptions—citizenship by descent to one generation born outside Canada. This means that children born to Canadian parents outside Canada would be Canadian at birth if one parent was born in Canada.

My father was born in Canada and I have an original copy of his birth certificate. He moved to the United States as a child and was in the US when World War II broke out. Supposedly he was given the option of returning to Canada to fight with the Canadian forces or to join the US Army. He joined the US Army and served in Europe. My understanding (he is now deceased) is that he became a US citizen at some point but I have no proof of that one way or another. I was born in the United States and my mother was American.

So my question is, am I a Canadian citizen or does it depend if he gave up his Canadian citizenship when he joined the US Army and supposedly became a US citizen? How would I find out if he is still considered a citizen or does it only matter that he was born in Canada and never had his citizenship taken away?
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Old 11-16-2016, 11:59 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,015 posts, read 5,791,876 times
Reputation: 10479
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyrey View Post
I have a question about Citizenship by descent
I understand the Citizenship Act was amended in 2009 to limit—with a few exceptions—citizenship by descent to one generation born outside Canada. This means that children born to Canadian parents outside Canada would be Canadian at birth if one parent was born in Canada.

My father was born in Canada and I have an original copy of his birth certificate. He moved to the United States as a child and was in the US when World War II broke out. Supposedly he was given the option of returning to Canada to fight with the Canadian forces or to join the US Army. He joined the US Army and served in Europe. My understanding (he is now deceased) is that he became a US citizen at some point but I have no proof of that one way or another. I was born in the United States and my mother was American.

So my question is, am I a Canadian citizen or does it depend if he gave up his Canadian citizenship when he joined the US Army and supposedly became a US citizen? How would I find out if he is still considered a citizen or does it only matter that he was born in Canada and never had his citizenship taken away?
Have you gone to this site to see if you may be a citizen by descent? See if you may be a citizen

During the 1st and 2nd world wars there were a good number of non-American citizens who joined and served in the American military without being required to become American citizens or to renounce citizenship in their countries of birth. So don't assume that because your dad served in US military that he gave up his Canadian citizenship. Even if he had made a verbal renunciation in America in order to join the military it would have only been an American formality because Canada doesn't recognize such renunciations and it does recognize dual citizenship.

I think it might be a good idea for you to speak to an immigration lawyer on your own behalf to determine your citizenship status. Your senior age (presumably you are a baby boomer considering your own father's age) and the fact that you've never claimed Canadian citizenship in all these many decades past might pose an obstacle to your status in the event you are hoping to immigrate permanently to Canada now. If you are a Canadian citizen but remain in USA you wouldn't be eligible for any Canadian healthcare benefits or government pensions. You would just be a recognized Canadian citizen with the right to visit Canada as you please.

Speak to an immigration lawyer.

.
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Old 11-23-2016, 10:00 PM
 
190 posts, read 108,108 times
Reputation: 268
I didn't see anything in the OP about retiring in Canada.
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Old 02-21-2017, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Canada
9 posts, read 7,748 times
Reputation: 15
Hi,

I am running a workshop in Ontario. I have a doubt regarding the obtaining PR for my NOC C level employee. He is from Costa Rica. He is going to be 2 years working for me. I know him well. He wishes to obtain PR as his work permit is going to expire. I would like to keep him as my staff as well.

I searched online in various immigration lawyers portals. I read about the Provincial Nominee Program ( Ontario Provincial Nominee Program Assistance Toronto | Max Berger PLC ) which I think can help my employee get a PR with level C job.

I would appreciate if you can clarify on these.

How long does this procedure take as his work permit expires in April 2017?
Will he have to return back to his homeland and return for the PR?

Thank you.
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Old 02-21-2017, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Montreal
10 posts, read 11,652 times
Reputation: 10
OMG! This five year old post is still very much active.
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Old 02-21-2017, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Montreal
10 posts, read 11,652 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat1109 View Post
Hi,

I am running a workshop in Ontario. I have a doubt regarding the obtaining PR for my NOC C level employee. He is from Costa Rica. He is going to be 2 years working for me. I know him well. He wishes to obtain PR as his work permit is going to expire. I would like to keep him as my staff as well.

I searched online in various immigration lawyers portals. I read about the Provincial Nominee Program ( Ontario Provincial Nominee Program Assistance Toronto | Max Berger PLC ) which I think can help my employee get a PR with level C job.

I would appreciate if you can clarify on these.

How long does this procedure take as his work permit expires in April 2017?
Will he have to return back to his homeland and return for the PR?

Thank you.
As per current situations in North America, the Canadian immigration department is really very much busy at this time. As of right now, they are getting tons of applications daily due to immigration policies of the new old man in the US.
If I remember correctly it will take up to 90 to 120 days, but I am not sure about this timeline.
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Old 05-06-2017, 02:39 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
19,865 posts, read 18,308,470 times
Reputation: 7955
Thinking of emigrating to Canada - again, had more or less abandoned the thought two years ago - and was wondering how hard it is these days to get in and how much the whole paperwork costs
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Old 07-25-2017, 10:09 PM
 
75 posts, read 88,506 times
Reputation: 25
How is the IT sector in Canada doing these days? Is it easy for recent immigrants to find a decent IT job there?
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