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Old 07-07-2012, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Nashua
123 posts, read 285,771 times
Reputation: 45

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I copied some information below from the CIC website... but they offer a lot more information & detail on the website...
I'm not sure how long you have to be a resident of Canada prior to becoming a PR but it appears to be at least 1 year or more. It does say on the website that you must be a PR for at least 2 years before applying for citizen ship. I second adventuregurl in the recommendation of contacting a immigration lawyer to gather more detailed information.

Best of luck


Immigrating to Canada
Immigrating to Canada

EFFECTIVE December 23, 2010: If you are submitting a language test with your application, the results are now valid for 2 years from the time you took the test, instead of 1 year. This change applies to Federal skilled worker, Canadian Experience Class and Business Class Immigrants (investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed people).

Immigrating to Canada permanently is an exciting opportunity. However, there are several things you should consider before you apply to be a permanent resident.

If you want to immigrate to Canada, there are a few different ways to apply. You will need to decide which immigration program will work best for you and your family.

Notice: Don’t be a victim of fraud — Find out more.

Find out about the requirements and the steps to apply in each category:

Skilled workers and professionals
For people who want to settle and work in Canada (outside of Quebec)
Quebec-selected skilled workers
For people selected by the Quebec government to settle and work in Quebec
Canadian Experience Class
For people who have recent Canadian work experience or have graduated and recently worked in Canada
Investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed people
For people who want to start a business in Canada
Provincial nominees
One of Canada’s provinces or territories can nominate you to settle and work there
Sponsoring your family
How to sponsor a family member to join you here if you are a permanent resident or a Canadian citizen





Live in Canada
About Being a Permanent Resident of Canada

A permanent resident is someone who has acquired permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not yet a Canadian citizen. Permanent residents have rights and privileges in Canada even though they remain citizens of their home country. In order to maintain permanent resident status, they must fulfill specified residency obligations.

A person in Canada temporarily, such as an international student or a temporary foreign worker, is not a permanent resident.

Refugees who are resettled from overseas arrive in Canada as permanent residents through the Government-Assisted Refugee Program or the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program. However, people who make refugee claims in Canada (either at a port of entry or a CIC office) are not permanent residents. In order to become one, these people must receive a positive decision on their refugee claim from the Immigration and Refugee Board. Then, they must apply for and be granted permanent resident status.

Learn about:

What permanent residents can do
What permanent residents cannot do
Keeping your permanent resident status
Losing your permanent resident status
The Permanent Resident Card
What permanent residents can do

As a permanent resident, you and your dependants have the right:

To receive most social benefits that Canadian citizens receive, including health care coverage.
To live, work or study anywhere in Canada.
To apply for Canadian citizenship.
To protection under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
You must pay taxes, and respect all Canadian laws at the federal, provincial and municipal levels.

What permanent residents cannot do

As a permanent resident, you and your dependants cannot:

Vote or run for political office.
Hold certain jobs that have a high-level security clearance requirement.
Remain in Canada if you are convicted of a serious criminal offence and have been told to leave the country.
Keeping your permanent





About Being a Permanent Resident of Canada

A permanent resident is someone who has acquired permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not yet a Canadian citizen. Permanent residents have rights and privileges in Canada even though they remain citizens of their home country. In order to maintain permanent resident status, they must fulfill specified residency obligations.

A person in Canada temporarily, such as an international student or a temporary foreign worker, is not a permanent resident.

Refugees who are resettled from overseas arrive in Canada as permanent residents through the Government-Assisted Refugee Program or the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program. However, people who make refugee claims in Canada (either at a port of entry or a CIC office) are not permanent residents. In order to become one, these people must receive a positive decision on their refugee claim from the Immigration and Refugee Board. Then, they must apply for and be granted permanent resident status.

Learn about:

What permanent residents can do
What permanent residents cannot do
Keeping your permanent resident status
Losing your permanent resident status
The Permanent Resident Card

Applying for a Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) - Initial application, replacement or renewal (IMM 5445)

Applying for a Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) - Initial application, replacement or renewal (IMM 5445)


Print this guide
Table of Contents

Overview
Before you apply
The application process
Step 1: Gather documents
Step 2: Complete the application
Step 3: Pay the fees
Step 4: Mail the application
What happens next?
How to contact CIC
Appendix A – Residency obligation
Appendix B – Photo specifications

The application process

The instructions provided in this guide follow the basic steps you will need to know to complete your application.

Gather documents
Complete the application
Pay the fees
Mail the application
Before you apply

Permanent Resident Card

The Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) is the official proof of your status as a permanent resident in Canada.

A Permanent Resident Card is a document required by permanent residents, including children, who are planning on travelling outside of Canada and then return to Canada by any commercial transporter such as plane, train, boat or bus.

Who may use this application

The Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) is the official proof of your status as a permanent resident in Canada.

This application is for permanent residents within Canada who would like to apply for:

an initial (first) PR Card
a renewal of a PR Card that has or will soon expire or
a replacement of a PR Card that has been lost, stolen or damaged
Important information. Do not apply for a renewal of your current PR card if it is still valid for more than one (1) year, unless it is due to a legal name change. Otherwise, your application will be returned.

Assessing your eligibility

To be eligible for a PR Card, you must:

be a permanent resident of Canada
be physically present in Canada
not be under an effective removal order
not be a Canadian citizen or a registered Indian under the Indian Act and
not be convicted of an offense related to the misuse of a PR card



Becoming a Canadian citizen: Who can apply
To be eligible to become a Canadian citizen, you must meet the requirements in all of the following areas:

Age
Permanent resident status
Time lived in Canada
Language abilities
Criminal history (prohibitions)
Knowledge of Canada


Permanent resident status

To become a Canadian citizen, you must have permanent resident status in Canada, and that status must not be in doubt. This means you must not be the subject of an immigration investigation, an immigration inquiry or a removal order (an order from Canadian officials to leave Canada).

Time lived in Canada

To become Canadian citizens, adults must have lived in Canada for at least three years (1,095 days) in the past four years before applying. Children under the age of 18 do not need to meet this requirement.

You may be able to count time you spent in Canada before you became a permanent resident if that time falls within the four-year period
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:21 AM
 
5 posts, read 53,466 times
Reputation: 10
Thumbs up Thanks

Thanks mcj79 for the wonderful reply. I will go through it.

But I am still not getting my answer for few questions
1) If I get PR card for Quebec, then as per consultancy in India I will get PR in 4 weeks of time. Once I get PR can I go to any other provenience for work and live. Also shall I avail all the medical facilities?

2) What is the payment of software test analyst or QA analyst in Canada? Need to know the salary in all the major providence’s? I need tentative amount.

3) How much money I need to have to live good life in Canada with my wife n 2 year old son.
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:23 AM
 
5 posts, read 53,466 times
Reputation: 10
Thumbs up Yup..

Quote:
Originally Posted by adventuregurl View Post
I don't think it's days, I think it's years. You really need a consultation with an immigration lawyer, most offer the first consult free.

Yes, as per my consultancy they said it will take around 12-18 months.
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Old 07-18-2012, 05:42 AM
 
3 posts, read 13,703 times
Reputation: 10
Unhappy When does the canadian working visa commence from?

Hi everyone, I am coming over to Toronto in march / April next year, and was wondering when you get a working visa , when does it commence from? If i applied for a visa and received it in december does it commence from then,? I am unsure! My partner is turning 31 in march. Do we have to leave before his 31st birthday also? I can't find any information about commencement dates of visas, would extremely like some help on this one , thanks heaps!
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:19 AM
 
Location: West Hollywood
127 posts, read 152,407 times
Reputation: 116
If I'm already approved for my AINP and have 0 health problems and 0 police records (I've already done the FBI background check; came up clean as expected), what are the odds of me getting a permanent residence?
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Old 09-06-2012, 05:02 AM
 
1 posts, read 10,855 times
Reputation: 10
Default what if a Non canadian marries a permanent resident of canada?

hello,
im a greek citizen (and that means european citizen too) and i live in greece and my gf is a permanent canadian resident that lives and works in canada most of the year. We are together 3 years now, but never in canada. We are planning to get married next year.
My question is, do i have the right to apply after my marriage for a permanent residence for canada too?
thanks in advance
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Old 09-06-2012, 08:03 AM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,408,994 times
Reputation: 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsouli12 View Post
hello,
im a greek citizen (and that means european citizen too) and i live in greece and my gf is a permanent canadian resident that lives and works in canada most of the year. We are together 3 years now, but never in canada. We are planning to get married next year.
My question is, do i have the right to apply after my marriage for a permanent residence for canada too?
thanks in advance
Yes, you're elibible to apply for Canadian PR. You've been together with your gf for 3 years. You don't need to get married in order to apply for Canadian permanent residency. You can apply as a Common Law spouse. The only thing you need to show is that you lived with your gf for at least 1 year in a genuine relationship the way a married couple would do.

Please don't understand me wrong. I'm not saying, you should not get married. I'm saying that marriage is not the prerequisite for you to be able to apply for Canadian PR.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:44 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,839 times
Reputation: 10
I have a border crossing question.

I want to go to Winnipeg this spring, then go sightseeing in other parts of Canada. I may stay for a month or 5 months. I am just not sure, depends on where I end up going. I won't go over the 6 months.

I understand that I may be questioned about where I am going and for how long. It is also my understanding that border patrol doesn't like vague answers and expects precise answers. I guess I will give the answers I am sure about, such as going to Winnipeg for a couple weeks.

Now, here is my question, if I tell the border patrol I am only there for 2 weeks, am I obligated to leave in 2 weeks or can I stay longer? Will I be able to stay up to the 6 month limit?
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Old 09-07-2012, 08:47 PM
 
42,766 posts, read 41,190,135 times
Reputation: 13687
I live in the USA and I did give it a try. I filled out a questionnaire to see if I would qualify for immigration to Canada. I filed under skilled worker. I just graduated from college. Actually, my mission was to get a job in Canada. My experience with GIS was through an internship, but that is it. I also sent my resume to an attorney who works with immigration. I was told that based on my education/work history, representing my application to Canadian Immigration would not be successful. I have a Bachelor's degree in Geography, and I have some skills in GIS. Part of me has wanted to live in Canada. I've been kind of confused about how to get work in Canada. I'm an American citizen, but I would like to work in Canada. I have been looking for jobs, but I've been apprehensive to apply. I need to find sponsorship.
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Old 09-07-2012, 11:25 PM
 
1,269 posts, read 3,236,595 times
Reputation: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryannull View Post
I have a border crossing question.

I want to go to Winnipeg this spring, then go sightseeing in other parts of Canada. I may stay for a month or 5 months. I am just not sure, depends on where I end up going. I won't go over the 6 months.

I understand that I may be questioned about where I am going and for how long. It is also my understanding that border patrol doesn't like vague answers and expects precise answers. I guess I will give the answers I am sure about, such as going to Winnipeg for a couple weeks.

Now, here is my question, if I tell the border patrol I am only there for 2 weeks, am I obligated to leave in 2 weeks or can I stay longer? Will I be able to stay up to the 6 month limit?
I'm assuming that you have a US passport, then you do not need a visa.

Travelers not requiring a visa to visit Canada, include the USA
Countries/Territories requiring visas

and theoretically, can stay up to 6 months less 1 day. However, I once came across a fellow traveler from a country not requiring a visa to visit Canada. She could not prove that she had sufficient funds for her stay not even for a day, and had to fly back on the next flight.

That said, I visited the US quite often. And depending on the US immigration officer on duty at YVR airport, I was questioned occasionally on the duration of my visit, etc. Fortunately I was able to provide my hotel confirmation slip, proof of funds, etc.

Hope this helps.
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