U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-17-2012, 10:13 PM
 
Location: CFL
903 posts, read 2,008,758 times
Reputation: 960

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MexiQuebecois View Post
Immigration is a nightmare, it's honestly one of the most stressful things I've had to do. I kind of have a bittersweet opinion about immigration to Canada. I do appreciate the fact that not just anyone can move there, and that's why it's so hard, but on the other hand, I'm also affected by all the procedures.

Today I went to get my fingerprints taken for a federal police check/records that I need to finalize my process, and it was a pain (though this is Mexican bureaucracy) First I had to hand in a whole bunch of documents, then they sent me across the city (Mexico City, so a huge distance) just to get the fingerprints, I spent at least 3 hours doing everything.
I feel your pain

For one of the last steps in US immigration i arrived at 7:00 AM at a building that didn't open until 9:00. There were a 100 people in line ahead of me.I didn't enter the building until almost noon. Shortly after that they closed the doors and told 100-200 people outside to try again tomorrow..
Once inside I went into the reception room and waited in a long line. This line was just to check i had all my paperwork and tell me which floor to go to.

The next room was easier . Sit and wait till they call your name 3 hours later..

I was able to leave around 5 with my green card.

Not all visits were quite as long as that day but I had similar visits another 3 or 4 times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-22-2012, 04:46 AM
 
1 posts, read 11,987 times
Reputation: 10
Unhappy Saving my PR

Hi,

I got my PR for Canada, but here's the problem. When I applied for PR for me and my family, it was me, my wife and my 2 yr old daughter. However, by the time the processing got done and I got my PR, I was blessed with a baby boy. If I need to get a PR for my lil one as well, it is going to take some more time and money which I don't have (especially the money part). This is what I am thinking of doing, but wanted to know if this is doable. I intend to travel alone to Canada and save my PR (I am the primary applicant) and let my wife's and daughter's PR expire. Post finding a job, I intend to apply the PR for everyone including my Mom and my son. Is this doable or will the embassy say that I should have disclosed about my son's information. My understanding, because I am allowing the previous PRs to expire, and when I apply again, it will be a fresh application, it should not be an issue. Correct me if my understanding is wrong because I don't want to spoil my chances.

Thanks for all the help.
Regards!
R
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2012, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 563,077 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by trahul View Post
Hi,

I got my PR for Canada, but here's the problem. When I applied for PR for me and my family, it was me, my wife and my 2 yr old daughter. However, by the time the processing got done and I got my PR, I was blessed with a baby boy. If I need to get a PR for my lil one as well, it is going to take some more time and money which I don't have (especially the money part). This is what I am thinking of doing, but wanted to know if this is doable. I intend to travel alone to Canada and save my PR (I am the primary applicant) and let my wife's and daughter's PR expire. Post finding a job, I intend to apply the PR for everyone including my Mom and my son. Is this doable or will the embassy say that I should have disclosed about my son's information. My understanding, because I am allowing the previous PRs to expire, and when I apply again, it will be a fresh application, it should not be an issue. Correct me if my understanding is wrong because I don't want to spoil my chances.

Thanks for all the help.
Regards!
R
You could do that, but you risk losing your own PR due to misrepresentation, because you didn't tell them about your baby.

My own personal advice would be for you to tell them what's going on and explain the situation.

Congrats on your baby boy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 563,077 times
Reputation: 154
Here are two interesting articles I just read. As some may know, There was a very controversial move by Mr. Jason Kenney that cancelled all applications sent before 2008 that hadn't been processed. This was part of his plan to "Modernize" the Canadian Immigration system.

Kenney says Canada not tossing would-be immigrants aside


Read it on Global News: Global News | Kenney says Canada not tossing would-be immigrants aside


REGINA - Immigration Minister Jason Kenney says the federal government is not tossing aside anyone who has been trying to get into Canada.

Kenney says people whose applications have been returned to them can reapply under new immigration programs - if they want to and are qualified.

Ottawa is legislating away a backlog of 280,000 applications made before 2008, saying it's a necessary part of modernizing the immigration system.

Some would-be immigrants said this week that they're taking the federal government to court.

Kenney says the government anticipated some immigration lawyers would try - in his words - to make a buck by suing the government.

But Kenney says the legislation is lawful and fair and will survive any judicial challenge.
Read it on Global News: Global News | Kenney says Canada not tossing would-be immigrants aside


Global News | Kenney says Canada not tossing would-be immigrants aside
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2012, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 563,077 times
Reputation: 154
Ever heard/seen that Hollywood stereotype that cabbies are doctors/overqualified?
Well it's partly true. Remember that the fact that you're accepted for immigration doesn't necessarily mean that your credentials will be recognized. You should always check with the provincial agency where you plan to leave if there are any exams/certifications that need to be done in order for you to practise your profession.

Over-educated immigrant cabbies plying Canadian streets, federal study finds


It's become a stereotype and a Hollywood movie cliche: Behind the wheel of most cabs sits an immigrant with a doctorate or a medical degree.
It turns out that, as with any stereotype, it has more than a grain of truth.

An unpublished study commissioned by the federal Department of Citizenship and Immigration built a profile of who was behind the wheels of cabs on Canadian streets.
The special study, entitled "Who Drives a Taxi in Canada," was obtained under Access to Information legislation by Toronto immigration lawyer Richard Kurland. It surveyed more than 50,000 cabbies based on income tax forms.

The study found more than 200 taxi drivers, mostly from the Toronto area, had been doctors in their home countries, the Toronto Sun reported.
It also turned up another 55 Canadian-born cabbies who were doctors or PhDs.

Overall, one out of every two drivers are immigrants and one in three were born in India or Pakistan, according to the survey.
Immigrant drivers listed business and management as their top field of study, while Canadian-born cabbies listed architecture and related fields.

Some 14 per cent of immigrant drivers had bachelor's degrees, compared with four per cent of Canadian-born drivers. More than five per cent had master's degrees, compared with one per cent for their Canadian-born counterparts.

Besides India and Pakistan, Lebanon, Iran, the United Kingdom, Bangladesh, Haiti and the United States are the countries where most educated cabbies come from.
Cab-company operators say immigrants make good employees and are prepared to sacrifice themselves for their families, the Sun reported.
Kurland said the number of well-educated immigrant cabbies surprised him.
"This confirms the urban myth that there are cab drivers who were doctors at home," he told the Sun.

The Globe and Mail, editorializing on the study, called the results "a dramatic loss of economic potential," which make the federal government's planned changes to immigration criteria even more important.

"These newcomers can contribute much more to Canada's productivity if their education and job experience can be converted into the Canadian job market," the Globe opined.

"Newcomers' difficulties in the job market are not a reflection of their own lack of education, but of bureaucratic bottlenecks, discrimination, gatekeeping by professions, and language difficulty. Everyone benefits if overqualified immigrant drivers can get out of their cars."






Over-educated immigrant cabbies plying Canadian streets, federal study finds | Daily Brew - Yahoo! News Canada
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: 78254
868 posts, read 1,906,310 times
Reputation: 311
Default Obtaining a Skilled Working Visa

Does one still need to have a valid job offer first before being eilgibile for a skilled working visa? Or is there another route to go to, to be able to work in Canada.

similar to the U.S you need to find a sponsor for the H1B visa.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2012, 09:21 PM
 
4,072 posts, read 7,331,383 times
Reputation: 4531
Quote:
Originally Posted by jons_wifey View Post
Does one still need to have a valid job offer first before being eilgibile for a skilled working visa? Or is there another route to go to, to be able to work in Canada.

similar to the U.S you need to find a sponsor for the H1B visa.
There are 2 ways: either have a pre-arranged job offer, OR fall under the list of professions Canada deems needed. The latter option doesn't require any job offer, you immigrate on your profession alone.

The list of professions re-starts every July 1st, and has a limit of total immigrants admitted. Right now, the total of 10,000 has been reached so the list has been removed. Watch this link closer to July 1st:

Eligibility criteria for federal skilled worker applications as of July 1, 2011
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2012, 10:39 PM
 
Location: 78254
868 posts, read 1,906,310 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
There are 2 ways: either have a pre-arranged job offer, OR fall under the list of professions Canada deems needed. The latter option doesn't require any job offer, you immigrate on your profession alone.

The list of professions re-starts every July 1st, and has a limit of total immigrants admitted. Right now, the total of 10,000 has been reached so the list has been removed. Watch this link closer to July 1st:

Eligibility criteria for federal skilled worker applications as of July 1, 2011

thanks Nuala.
My occupation code is NOC 2282.
So if my code is still there in the list in July, do I just go to apply for a work visa, to be able to work in Canada?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2012, 06:04 AM
 
4,072 posts, read 7,331,383 times
Reputation: 4531
Quote:
Originally Posted by jons_wifey View Post
thanks Nuala.
My occupation code is NOC 2282.
So if my code is still there in the list in July, do I just go to apply for a work visa, to be able to work in Canada?
The Federal Skilled Workers category is an immigration category, so you would be applying to become an immigrant, versus a "work visa" that implies a short-term stint. The "work visa" similar to your H1-B is called "a work permit" here, and it would need a job offer first:

Working temporarily in Canada

As an immigrant, you would have the right to apply to different jobs inside Canada, and can go back and forth between USA and Canada without needing a visa. Sounds better than the work permit, BUT the waiting time, after you submit all the paperwork, may take 1-2 plus years (I think the OP mentioned he's been waiting for 3 years).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2012, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Ontario
329 posts, read 704,292 times
Reputation: 284
Default moving to canada and medications

When I move to Canada should I just get my doctor to write me a new script and have it filled in Canada? Are they able to give me pills with an American presciption? Anybody go through this before?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top