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Old 05-29-2011, 03:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riverbird View Post
Thanks! That's kind of you, although I wouldn't expect anyone to come all the way from Mars. ;-)

I have no immediate need to be driven home. I'm just wondering what other single people do in such situations where they're new in town. Asking for help to get home from a colonoscopy isn't something one would say to a casual acquaintance!

This is a very pertinent question and one I ask myself from time to time even staying in the same locale. It has happened to me after having a colonoscopy and an outpatient eye procedure. Both times I had to ask people who had to take time off from their work. It becomes more relevant a question the older one gets as well. I understand the hospital policy which is basically covering themselves legally but nonetheless.

 
Old 05-29-2011, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morwyn_7 View Post
This is a very pertinent question and one I ask myself from time to time even staying in the same locale. It has happened to me after having a colonoscopy and an outpatient eye procedure. Both times I had to ask people who had to take time off from their work. It becomes more relevant a question the older one gets as well. I understand the hospital policy which is basically covering themselves legally but nonetheless.
In these cases just contact your nearest senior center* and ask for a staff member or volunteer to come get you on the senior van and take you home. You can of course offer a stipend such as $10 or more but this to me is the safest way to go. We need our friends for real emergencies.

*That's why I maintain that, wherever we move, be sure there's a good senior agency/center in that location - esp for those who live alone.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 04:50 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,037,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post

*That's why I maintain that, wherever we move, be sure there's a good senior agency/center in that location - esp for those who live alone.
To this I would add not to move too far out from a city where the services you might need are offered. Otherwise even paid transportation options might be limited.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 05:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
To this I would add not to move too far out from a city where the services you might need are offered. Otherwise even paid transportation options might be limited.
This is important consideration. I want to point out that there are strict federal requirements for providing paratransit transportation services to the disabled under The Americans With Disability Act of 1990. This is defined in
49 CFR 37.131
49 CFR 37.131 - Service criteria for complementary paratransit. - Code of Federal Regulations - Title 49: Transportation - Subpart F: Paratransit as a complement to fixed route service - vLex

Simply, it says that services must be provided within 3/4 mile of a fixed public transit route. So, to get services make sure you live within that boundary. Here in Denver the boundaries are defined clearly on the transit map. You then can get services from/to within this boundary.

Being elderly can be defined as disabled for this regulation if you cannot ambulate to the bus stop because of age related deterioration of arthritis, diminished mental capability, weather related disability etc. My parents qualified because they were in the eighties and could not walk to the bus. Eventually, all of us, will become disabled if we live to an elderly age--again plan ahead, where you will be living.

Many people who live in suburban developments are surprised when the need arises for services that they cannot get it. So, be careful where you live. Yes, there are other services in rural areas and additional services in cities run by many different agencies but you cannot always be assured that they will exist or stay funded.

However, living near a public transit route, you are more assured of the service because it is federal mandated; it is a Unfunded Federal Mandate such that it is required even if no federal funds are provided. Many public transit agencies, which is the past provided services beyond 3/4 miles, have retrenched back to the requirements because of financial difficulties.

I want to reinterate that this is nationwide requirement. It would be helpful for everyone to research this issue in the areas where you live, even if you do not at the present time need the service. I think this is even more of a reason that a larger metropolitan area with good public transit is a better option for retirement.

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 05-29-2011 at 06:17 PM..
 
Old 05-29-2011, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
3,456 posts, read 2,256,758 times
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The thought about needing a driver after an outpatient procedure was one of the many reasons why I chose to move to a 55+ community. Our community offers volunteer rides to and from the hospital or clinic for single people like me. It's comforting to know that all it will take will be a phone call when I need assistance.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 07:35 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,037,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I want to reinterate that this is nationwide requirement. It would be helpful for everyone to research this issue in the areas where you live, even if you do not at the present time need the service. I think this is even more of a reason that a larger metropolitan area with good public transit is a better option for retirement.

Livecontent
I have to agree even though for me with my disability moving back to a city will mean a decline in health.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 11:01 PM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I have to agree even though for me with my disability moving back to a city will mean a decline in health.
Yes, large metro areas tend to have better public transit but many small towns have public transit. They still are required to provide the paratransit services. You do not really need to have a large area to go; a small public transit would work as long as provided services to the basic necessities of groceries, some stores and healthcare.

As I said, even in large metro areas many seniors get all their services from a small area. In many cases, these areas for necessities are much smaller than some rural small towns because healthcare and shopping are much farther apart because they serve multiple towns.
 
Old 05-29-2011, 11:34 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,622 posts, read 39,986,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windwalker2 View Post
I have to agree even though for me with my disability moving back to a city will mean a decline in health.
This really depends on the regional advocacy & support for senior services. I volunteer in a very remote county that has excellent senior transportation through 3 sources (volunteer (compensated), private contracted services, and 3x / day public transit for the 40 miles to nearest town with DR's ... ($1 each way, but for seniors with an appointment it is free).

I helped with a couple who for 30 yrs of retirement got free 'door-to-door' transit to the senior center 4x / week for meals + all appointments.

Rural areas can actually be MUCH cheaper and convenient for seniors (even those needing care and transportation). There are lots of funding options available to under-served areas and often the neighbors, employee caregivers, / community are more prone to care / watch out for each other. There are 100's of thousands or seniors happily, safely, and economically living in rural regions.

I have been interviewing urban and rural senior services for several couples and individuals I assist. I enjoy the benefit of sitting down with a person who manages a 5 county rural region that spans state lines. (and is 3 hrs drive end to end). I can get an answer and several alternatives in about 10 minutes. With the urban areas, It takes about a month to get to the correct person and get an answer (that may likely not include a solution).

YMMV
 
Old 05-30-2011, 01:31 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 13,552,001 times
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In a small rural region, you would have to drive sometimes hours to see a specialist or get expensive medical test that are done at larger regional hospitals and clinics; for specialist do not have the patient base to practice in small areas and test equipment is expensive. Medical care is much more complicated than it was decades ago--it is highly technical and doctors cannot functions without their "toys".

Another big problem is the availability of Doctors in rural areas. There is a severe crisis to get doctors to practice in rural areas. Part of the issues is that they are trained in urban areas and become use to the support of fellow doctors and facilities; they want to make more money; want the amenities that their money can buy and they want not to be the only doctor who works around the clock.

In addition, time is the most important factor to save a life from severe injury and treatment at a Trauma Center is immediately required. Level 1 Trauma Centers are located in cities not in every rural town but in regional locations. All hospitals are not the same in the level of care that they can provide. Many hospitals claim to be trauma centers but are not verified as such and you will find that the verified Level 1 Trauma Centers are mostly located in Larger Metro areas and there may be more than one. Do not think that helicopter transport is always the answer because it takes time; as the flight has to get to you and take you to a trauma center. In the mountains of Colorado, many times a helicopter cannot fly because of weather.

This post is only to inform you of the reality of the situation. I am not against living in rural areas but it is not all pastoral, peaceful and practical when you are old, sick or injured. Not all rural areas are the same and some provide much more care options. Here in Colorado, we have designated frontier counties where there is minimum medical care--if any. It is hilarious the people who want to retire in the Mountain Communities of Colorado and then realize that when they get older they need care that is distant, inconvenient and sometimes too late. You then see these people sell and move to a city.

Of course, if you follow my obsessive, paronoid, hypochondrial advice, you would never travel in the wonderful remote areas of our country. Sometimes you just have to live and not worry about every problem.

Just to note that I spent time in Antarctica with very minimal medical care--never again!

Livecontent

Last edited by livecontent; 05-30-2011 at 01:47 AM..
 
Old 05-30-2011, 04:59 AM
 
13,322 posts, read 25,574,131 times
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When I got my one and only colonoscopy, I found a driver in the local paper who was basically running a taxi-type service. I live about ten miles from the hospital but there is absolutely no public transport or taxi service where I live, and the people I know all work during the day. So I called this woman. Forget what it cost, but it worked for me. I think there'll be more and more of this kind of service as people age outside of cities, that is, in suburbs. (I'm in a former farm town, now part of a metro area, but still feeling rural).
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