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Old 07-03-2023, 06:27 AM
 
Location: western NY
6,189 posts, read 2,972,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toolsdevflips View Post
The perception of working in a trade as the "greatest job in the world" varies, but fewer people choose trade careers due to societal emphasis on college education, limited awareness of trade schools, and misconceptions about these professions. Efforts are needed to promote trade schools as viable alternatives, highlighting job security, competitive wages, and entrepreneurial opportunities to encourage more people to consider trade careers.
Well stated, and I agree. I recall, as I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, the "word on the street" was that within the near future, you'll have to have a college degree, just to sweep streets for your town's sanitation department.

50 years later, as I reflect back on that sentiment, I think it was little more than American academia wanting/creating a need to perpetuate itself, and remain gainfully employed, that fueled that train of thought. That philosophy overlooked the basic facts that A) not every person is "college material"; B) not all jobs require a college education; and C) some of those jobs, while not needing a college degree, are indeed essential to the survival of society, as we now have it.

And as a side note, yeah, a framed college degree, hanging on your wall is nice, but a substantial paycheck in your hand, every Friday is even nicer....
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Old 07-03-2023, 07:22 AM
 
28,563 posts, read 18,570,253 times
Reputation: 30807
Quote:
Originally Posted by leadfoot4 View Post
That philosophy overlooked the basic facts that A) not every person is "college material"; B) not all jobs require a college education; and C) some of those jobs, while not needing a college degree, are indeed essential to the survival of society, as we now have it.
Can't rep you again.
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Old 07-03-2023, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,154 posts, read 23,808,801 times
Reputation: 32540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
...
But if the equivalent in vocational studies were offered in high school, there would be more kids interested in high school.
I'll be interested in seeing your actual evidence for that.
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Old 07-03-2023, 10:29 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
8,444 posts, read 3,705,317 times
Reputation: 5680
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
one important point that is missing (pre college / job training), is career exposure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
But if the equivalent in vocational studies were offered in high school, there would be more kids interested in high school.
In other words, you don’t expect high-schools to ‘promote trades’ (as many already do participate in career fairs and/or are relative to career assessment testing anyway); rather, you want high schools to become the vocational school in and of itself.
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Old 07-03-2023, 10:35 AM
 
28,563 posts, read 18,570,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
In other words, you don’t expect high-schools to ‘promote trades’ (as many already do participate in career fairs and/or are relative to career assessment testing anyway); rather, you want high schools to become the vocational school in and of itself.
You've already quoted my earlier post that proves you're lying.
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Old 07-03-2023, 10:46 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,565 posts, read 57,493,759 times
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Quote:
you want high schools to become the vocational school in and of itself.
Wrong.
HS could educate (well), and get out of the 'streaming' business! (Which they are terrible at).

Equal opportunity 'comprehensive' education. HS is really quite late to be thinking of future career choices, better get some exposure in time to make a sound decision.

Equip the students to think (thoroughly), then stand back and be amazed at their excellent choices. Open the doors to the opportunities of the world.

As a higher Ed instructor, and a skilled trades master (apprentice trainer), there is a vast difference in comprehension and application for students who have actually been exposed and employed in relevant working careers.

Military (mandatory) is not a bad plan for most. That route could easily be expanded to job corp / community service for our pacifists and strict academically bound (unwilling to serve). They would be great doctors, lawyers, managers, analysts with a dabble of real life experience sprinkled in as foundational learnings. This is ever more needed with the product of latchkey / coddled youth going direct to college, thinking they are going to exit knowing how to live / be an adult.

Don't beat the college drum, it's not working. (For all)

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 07-03-2023 at 10:54 AM..
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Old 07-03-2023, 10:55 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
8,444 posts, read 3,705,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Don't beat the college drum, it's not working. (For all)
No one expects you (or everyone) to go to college; it’s a matter of choice and aptitude. That said, it’s nonsensical to think high-schools should promote the trades (per the thread) or any specific career, for that matter. They don’t promote academically-elite universities either; again, most students fall in the middle (and attend some sort of college or vocational training anyway).

It’s on vocational schools to promote themselves (and many do).
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Old 07-03-2023, 11:27 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,565 posts, read 57,493,759 times
Reputation: 45937
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
it’s nonsensical to think high-schools should promote the trades (per the thread) or any specific career, for that matter.

.
equally nonsensical for HS to 'stream' for college (as they do).

Just teach, that's novel

The condescending OP and thread title says nothing about the HS advertising agenda or requirement.

Quote:
People act like working in a trade is the greatest job in the world. Then why do so few people want to do it then? Why doesn’t society push going into trade school rather than going into college ?
'society' really doesn't have a role in 'promoting' a specific career agenda (though it does through various means... if you let it).
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Old 07-03-2023, 12:48 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
8,444 posts, read 3,705,317 times
Reputation: 5680
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportslover View Post
People act like working in a trade is the greatest job in the world. Then why do so few people want to do it then? Why doesn’t society push going into trade school rather than going into college ?
OP - if so many thought working in a trade is ‘the greatest job in the world’, there would be (far) more folks entering trade schools sans any need of a ‘push’ from society. That said, where is the logicality re: ‘pushing’ folks into careers (or college, for that matter)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Why would anyone want someone who didn't do well in school to be working on their plumbing or electrical system?
The reality is, it is often the case; keep in mind most trade schools accept GED certificates (and many attend as a last resort). However, that they didn’t do well in school doesn’t mean they can’t learn a hands-on skill or trade (and do it well). It is a viable option for many.
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Old 07-03-2023, 01:49 PM
 
28,563 posts, read 18,570,253 times
Reputation: 30807
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
The reality is, it is often the case; keep in mind most trade schools accept GED certificates (and many attend as a last resort). However, that they didn’t do well in school doesn’t mean they can’t learn a hands-on skill or trade (and do it well). It is a viable option for many.
Back in the early 90s, the governor of Hawaii compared the state's high school curriculum with the jobs available in the state and announced publicly, "Our high schools are a waste of time for most of our kids, and they know it." Hawaii is not at all unique in that respect.

Sixty percent of kids who know by the end of the 9th grade that they don't want an academic career. I think giving them the option of a curriculum that clearly leads to advanced job training would keep them more involved in succeeding in that curriculum.
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